Sunday Sacredness Examined

“And upon the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them, ready to depart on the morrow; and continued his speech until midnight.” – Acts 20:7

“Upon the first day of the week let every one of you lay by him in store, as God hath prospered him, that there be no gatherings when I come.” – 1 Corinthians 16:2

“The Christian Sabbath is Sunday” says the believer of Sunday-Worship. Then follows a  collection of Scriptures, which on the surface seem to support this very claim. Seemingly triumphant over the Sabbath-keeper, the average Sunday-keeping Christian exults in an apparent victory over the observer of the fourth commandment. The above two Bible passages, thrown out to support these claims as stock arguments against the Seventh-Day Sabbath, are often produced by those seeking to combat Sabbath keeping.

It is saddening to see the great lengths many will go to in defense of tradition, rather than adopting a teachable spirit and allowing the Bible to speak for itself. As I point out in my writings on how to study the Bible, we must always come to Scripture with a teachable spirit, rather than making the Bible say what we want it to. These Scriptures, produced in support of Sunday-worship, are an evidence that somebody approached Scripture with a lot of assumptions. They came to the Bible with the idea that they were going to make it ‘prove’ that we must worship on Sunday, and then forced that meaning on to the text without thorough examination. This should become much more obvious as we engage in a deep examination of these passages.

The question should then at this point be asked, “what exactly makes a day sacred?” This question holds a high degree of importance to it. The answer will determine whether or not these texts prove the sacredness of Sunday, and if Sunday has indeed become the Christian Sabbath. With that thought in mind, it is a logical deduction to examine the original Sabbath to determine what attached sacredness to this day. This will give us the answer as to what exactly attaches sacredness to a day, and sets it apart from any other day of the week. Then we must turn back to the beginning, when the earth was first created.

“Thus the heavens and the earth were finished, and all the host of them. And on the seventh day God ended his work which he had made; and he rested on the seventh day from all his work which he had made. And God blessed the seventh day, and sanctified it: because that in it he had rested from all his work which God created and made.” – Genesis 2:1-3

“But the seventh day is the sabbath of the LORD thy God: in it thou shalt not do any work, thou, nor thy son, nor thy daughter, thy manservant, nor thy maidservant, nor thy cattle, nor thy stranger that is within thy gates: For in six days the LORD made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that in them is, and rested the seventh day: wherefore the LORD blessed the sabbath day, and hallowed it.” – Exodus 20:10-11

The statements from the book of Genesis speak of the creation of the earth. The very next thing which is mentioned is the end of God’s work on the seventh day, followed by a description of him resting from all of his work. He then blesses the seventh day and sanctifies it, with the reasoning being connected to his resting from the creation of the earth. Notice that in the book of Exodus in the twentieth chapter, these events are clearly referenced. The eleventh verse mentions the creation of the world, then God’s resting on the seventh day, which is then followed by a blessing on the Sabbath day and it being hallowed. The tenth verse also identifies the seventh-day as being the Sabbath, finishing off a clear connection between these passages.

It would stand to reason that the word “hallowed” is essentially the same thing or holds the same meaning as the word “sanctified”, because Exodus 20:11 uses this word in place of “Sanctified” and contains an obvious reference to the passages from Genesis, which suggests that the two are synonymous. However, in order to arrive at the true definition of these words I have produced a series of Scriptures below. You will notice that in Leviticus 27:14 it states “And when a man shall sanctify his house to be holy”. The passage makes this statement as though the act of sanctifying the house would make it holy in and of itself, indicating that the word bears huge connotations of making something holy. I would also single out Exodus 40:9, which uses the word “hallow” and then concludes with “and it shall be holy”, thus indicating that to hallow something would essentially make it holy. Note that the way the Bible is using these terms in all of the passages quoted below is in complete harmony with Webster’s definitions for the two words. Thus to sanctify and hallow something is to make it holy.

“Sanctify yourselves therefore, and be ye holy: for I am the LORD your God.” – Leviticus 20:7

“And when a man shall sanctify his house to be holy unto the LORD, then the priest shall estimate it, whether it be good or bad: as the priest shall estimate it, so shall it stand.” – Leviticus 27:14

“And the altar of burnt offering with all his vessels, and the laver and his foot. And thou shalt sanctify them, that they may be most holy: whatsoever toucheth them shall be holy.” – Exodus 30:28-29

“And thou shalt take the anointing oil, and anoint the tabernacle, and all that is therein, and shalt hallow it, and all the vessels thereof: and it shall be holy.” – Exodus 40:9

Sanctified

SANC’TIFIED, pp.

1. Made holy; consecrated; set apart for sacred services.

2. Affectedly holy.

Hallowed

HAL’LOWED, pp. Consecrated to a sacred use, or to religious exercises; treated as sacred; reverenced.

If something therefore has been made holy, than obviously there is a degree of sacredness attached to it. Than truthfully this is what would make a day sacred in Scripture. If it has been directly sanctified or hallowed, than we may conclude that it is to be regarded as sacred. Nothing else is acceptable as evidence for the supposed sacredness of a day. Even apparent meetings taking place on that day do not prove the day in question to have been regarded with sacredness, as there could be a number of common reasons for meetings [whether they are of a religious character or not] to be held.

We might also direct your attention to the word “blessed” as used in both Genesis 2:1-3 and Exodus 20:11. This word does not need any lengthy explanation, but we may logically conclude that this term would indicate that something is to be regarded as special. The two words “blessed” and “sanctified” or “hallowed” when combined carry a weighty testimony as to what constitutes sacredness. Can any of this be produced in connection with the first day of the week? In spite of access to a very powerful Bible search engine in the form of E-sword, I conveniently am unable to produce a text which connects these words with that day.

In fact, all of the references to the first day of the week in the Bible have been produced below. You will notice that none of them ever attach the words “blessed”, “sanctified”, or “hallowed” to that day. Therefore none of these statements prove that Sunday has any sacredness whatsoever. The majority of them describe events taking place on this day, but never attach any level of sacredness to it. You will find that not one of these texts says anything to the effect of, “Remember the first day of the week, to keep it holy; because on the first day of the week he rose from the grave.” When studied in context, many of these texts reference the resurrection of Christ. Yet not one of them, when all the verses are examined before and after these texts, uses the words “blessed”, “sanctified”, “hallowed” or flat out “made holy.” Those words cannot be located in any of the surrounding Scriptures either. This fact is something I invite you to see for yourself, as you will notice some of the Scripture references below contain embedded links.

“In the end of the sabbath, as it began to dawn toward the first day of the week, came Mary Magdalene and the other Mary to see the sepulchre.” – Matthew 28:1

“And very early in the morning the first day of the week, they came unto the sepulchre at the rising of the sun.” – Mark 16:2

“Now when Jesus was risen early the first day of the week, he appeared first to Mary Magdalene, out of whom he had cast seven devils.” – Mark 16:9

“Now upon the first day of the week, very early in the morning, they came unto the sepulchre, bringing the spices which they had prepared, and certain others with them.” – Luke 24:1

“The first day of the week cometh Mary Magdalene early, when it was yet dark, unto the sepulchre, and seeth the stone taken away from the sepulchre.” – John 20:1

“Then the same day at evening, being the first day of the week, when the doors were shut where the disciples were assembled for fear of the Jews, came Jesus and stood in the midst, and saith unto them, Peace be unto you.” – John 20:19

“And upon the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them, ready to depart on the morrow; and continued his speech until midnight.” – Acts 20:7

“Upon the first day of the week let every one of you lay by him in store, as God hath prospered him, that there be no gatherings when I come.” – 1 Corinthians 16:2

If none of these statements attach any sacredness to Sunday whatsoever, than it is clear that really these statements of the Bible do not prove anything. Without the markers of sacredness, they do not define the first day of the week as anything other than an ordinary day. It is also prudent at this point to expose what else is missing from these statements. Were one to take a look at the difference between the fourth commandment and these passages, what might they notice?

It is all in the name, for the fourth commandment is just that — a commandment. Only one of these statements bears any appearance of a command, and you might notice that the instruction is not to worship on Sunday but rather to “every one of you lay by him in store” on the “first day of the week”. The fourth commandment is much more explicit. You are told the exact day on which you are to worship, how you are to observe that day as holy, in addition to the fact that you are given the reasons why you are to do this; namely being the creation and God’s sanctifying and blessing of that day.

In contrast, if these statements from Scripture regarding the first day did prove that we’re now to worship on Sunday they are in fact rather vague. A fresh convert with no knowledge of the Bible or Christianity could read these passages and never get the idea that we’re to worship on Sunday from them alone, strictly because none of these texts include any instruction of the sort. Six of the verses are historical records, one is a recording of a gathering taking place, and the final statement talks about laying money aside. However none of these verses really transfer sacredness from one day to the other, command worship on the first day of the week, instruct us to remember it, or give directions as to how to keep it holy.

It is interesting to note that the reasons which Christians commonly claim for Sunday worship, that being that Jesus rose from the grave on that day, are not connected to the two most common quotations that supposedly prove Sunday sacredness. One mentions a gathering on the first day of the week “to break bread”, but says nothing about the resurrection either in the context or the passages that immediately follow. The second verse makes some vague statements about “laying by him in store”, says something about a collection in the verse before it, but doesn’t say a word about the resurrection. Whereas the statements that are connected to Jesus rising from the grave do not command worship on that day, say nothing about Sunday’s supposed holiness because of it, or strangely enough do not say anything to the effect of “and now Christians commonly gather on this day because of these things.” You would think with such powerful descriptions of the resurrection, there would be room to say something along those lines. Surely an extra sentence could not in any way make Scripture too lengthy.

Is it not a logical deduction that if God wanted us to worship on Sunday, he would give us exact directions surrounding his desires, that we may not be left in darkness as to what his will is? Would he not want to leave no question in people’s minds as to what he wants us to do? It seems kind of odd that God would, in the place of explicit directions, give us nothing but vague statements to work with. The reality is that some one has taken the first two statements in question, and twisted them in support of tradition, without investigating the Biblical foundations for their practices. When some one takes liberties with Bible verses, it is probably a good bet that their teachings are starting to lean in the direction of false.

So what of the gathering that the passage from Acts mentions? It is claimed that since the disciples are described as coming together to break bread on the first day of the week, and Paul is preaching, than therefore this must be a church service taking place on Sunday. The reasoning is then that this was becoming the regular practice of the Christians, that they had begun to abandon the Sabbath for the First day of the week to honor the resurrection, and that this text somehow proves that early Christians worshiped on the first day of the week. There are a couple of realities that somebody missed in their neglect to examine the foundations for their thinking.

The first comes from the mysterious phrase, “to break bread.” This is usually looked at by the advocate of Sunday sacredness and worship as being something significant, like communion, or in and of itself referencing a church service. The claim then might be something to the effect of communion always falling on a Sunday, which is a thought that has been demolished by others. However, we might direct your attention to the neglected verses. You might notice that these passages comment on the issue of “breaking bread.”

“And they, continuing daily with one accord in the temple, and breaking bread from house to house, did eat their meat with gladness and singleness of heart, Praising God, and having favour with all the people. And the Lord added to the church daily such as should be saved.” – Acts 2:46-47

Breaking bread does not always mean something significant like communion. The disciples are described in the second chapter of the book of Acts as doing this every day. In reality, the phrase “breaking bread” simply just means that they came together to eat food. That thought also destroys the possibility of it referencing their Church services. If one were to interpret the phrase this way, they may as well claim that early Christianity regarded every day as holy.

Another fact so often missed by the advocates of first-day worship rests in the claim that early Christians worshiped on the first day of the week in Paul’s day. In response, I might direct your attention to the references above which use the phrase “first day of the week.” These are the only verses in the Bible which use that phrase. Bible search engines and concordances fail to produce another verse, neither can anyone claim to have read one without lying. To further illustrate this point, I narrowed the search range on E-sword to the book of Acts and have produced the Bible-wide search results in this link for your perusal.

Act_20:7 And upon the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them, ready to depart on the morrow; and continued his speech until midnight.

1 verse found, 8 matches

Acts 1 verse found 8 matches

The book of Acts, being a historical record of Christianity directly after Christ, would be the most likely place to mention the switch from the Seventh-Day to the first. The only other places in which this could happen would be the epistles and the gospels, but none of those locations in Scripture say a word about the supposed change. In this particular case, it is pretty clear that the book of Acts doesn’t mention any other instance in which Paul, the disciples, or the apostles met on the first day of the week. With these facts before us, its clear that this is the only recorded instance in the entire Bible in which the followers of Christ appear to be having a meeting of an apparently religious character on Sunday. They are never mentioned as doing this again anywhere in the Bible.

I find it strange that from this lone Bible verse we are expected to believe that early Christianity in the time of Paul worshiped on Sunday. It is a thought which leaves a man who truly thinks the matter through scratching his head in apparent confusion. To further illustrate why this doesn’t constitute real evidence of that thought, I would like to direct your attention to the passage I’ve produced below. Notice that it describes Jesus [see verses 14-15 of Luke 4] entering the synagogue on the Sabbath, and standing up to read. Specifically you should focus in on the phrase “as his custom was.” This statement implies that this was a regular habit for Christ, or rather a tradition if you will. Note that this phrase is missing from Acts 20:7.

If this lone Bible verse had said that it was the custom of the Christians to meet on the first day of the week, than perhaps there would be a valid case. Yet such a statement is missing from the passage! The implication is that this is the only time that early Christianity in the time of Paul ever met on a Sunday. In which case it was not their regular practice, and therefore it cannot be claimed that early Christianity in the time of Paul worshiped on Sunday in honor of the resurrection. There just simply is not sufficient evidence upon which to make that case.

“And he came to Nazareth, where he had been brought up: and, as his custom was, he went into the synagogue on the sabbath day, and stood up for to read.” – Luke 4:16

Let us stop and think about this for a moment. The lack of Bible passages elsewhere in Scripture which describe similar occurrences bears the marks of something quite sad. Somebody came to the Bible with the idea that they were going to make it say what they wanted it to. They have practiced what is known as Eisegesis, which is something we have discussed in other articles. Having practiced this, they abused the text in support of tradition rather than approaching the Scriptures with a teachable spirit. It is my hope that you do not approach the Bible in this way!

The arguments surrounding this text from the book of acts are quite obviously full of holes. This fact becomes much more clear as the surrounding passages are examined. The reality of it is this meeting never actually really took place on what we would call “Sunday”. Most who use this passage in support of traditional thinking do not consider the description of what a day is in the Biblical sense. Note that Genesis 1:5 defines a Biblical day by stating that the, “evening and the morning were the first day.” According to Scripture, a day is defined as evening to morning, which is a huge difference from the modern definition of midnight to midnight. Thus a statement can read, “first day of the week” and in actual fact be in reference to the evening of what we would interpret as the previous day.

Paying careful attention to the passage, we notice details such as many lights in the upper chambers, the length of the sermon defined as being until midnight, and Eutychus falling into a deep sleep. Every single one of these details bears the markers of “evening”. The presence of lighting indicates that it was dark, the statement about ‘midnight’ places the setting at evening, and Eutychus falling asleep indicates that he was tired. Boring preaching did not put him to sleep, but rather the fact that they had been awake late. With all of these facts before us, it is clear that in actual fact they did not meet on Sunday but rather on Saturday night. Therefore the concept of a Sunday church service completely disappears under the weight of the original connection of the passage.

“And upon the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them, ready to depart on the morrow; and continued his speech until midnight. And there were many lights in the upper chamber, where they were gathered together. And there sat in a window a certain young man named Eutychus, being fallen into a deep sleep: and as Paul was long preaching, he sunk down with sleep, and fell down from the third loft, and was taken up dead.” – Acts 20:7-9

“And God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And the evening and the morning were the first day.” – Genesis 1:5

This is of course even further the case as one examines the defined reasons for the meeting. The passage often abused contains the phrase, “ready to depart on the morrow.” This statement implies that Paul was intent on leaving the following day. In other words, the whole point of the meeting was not having a religious meeting in honor of the resurrection, coming together for communion, or something of that sort but was indeed rather a farewell meeting. Paul was leaving, therefore the disciples came together to break bread and say their goodbyes on Sabbath evening.

I hope that you are able to see that this argument in support of Sunday sacredness is not sound. Chances are, the use of 1 Corinthians 16:1-2 to support Sunday sacredness is even less sound. I have produced the passages below with their original connection, as context is always important and sheds much light on the meaning of a verse. The claim is that these passages are referencing a church collection which took place on Sunday, and are therefore an argument in support of Sunday sacredness, or the transfer of the Sabbath from Saturday to Sunday. However, it is my hope and prayer that you might see that this argument actually doesn’t work or bear the scrutiny of Scripture. Notice also that I have produced the fourth commandment underneath this statement for comparison.

“Now concerning the collection for the saints, as I have given order to the churches of Galatia, even so do ye. Upon the first day of the week let every one of you lay by him in store, as God hath prospered him, that there be no gatherings when I come.” – 1 Corinthians 16:1-2

“Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days shalt thou labour, and do all thy work: But the seventh day is the sabbath of the LORD thy God: in it thou shalt not do any work, thou, nor thy son, nor thy daughter, thy manservant, nor thy maidservant, nor thy cattle, nor thy stranger that is within thy gates: For in six days the LORD made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that in them is, and rested the seventh day: wherefore the LORD blessed the sabbath day, and hallowed it.” – Exodus 20:8-11

Although I have already made similar points above, I see it as prudent to restate a few details. In comparison with these passages from Exodus, I hope that you might be able to see what I am talking about with much more clarity. Notice the difference between these two statements from the Bible. One mentions a collection, and then says something to the effect of “lay by him in store.” The other says to remember the Sabbath day to keep it holy. It then gives directions as to how the Sabbath may be kept, and closes by mentioning creation and the blessing and hallowing of the Sabbath.

The question which arises in my mind comes right down to this. If these statements from 1 Corinthians 16:1-2 transfer the Sabbath from Saturday to Sunday, why are they missing a statement of blessing and sanctification? Why is it that these statements say nothing about the Christian’s supposed duty to Remember the “Christian Sabbath”? Why do they not outright command Sunday to be kept holy? Why is it that these statements do not include a word about the resurrection of Christ? All of the necessary information was together in one place with the original Sabbath, so that the reader is without excuse. Yet obviously this is not the case with these statements from Paul, as they are clearly missing huge details.

The missing details indicates that somebody has obviously twisted these statements. Others have even provided significant evidence further detailing this fact, showing conclusively how these Scriptures have been abused. They’ve even gone so far as to point out that these passages actually do not indicate that the Corinthian believers worshiped on Sunday, as is so often claimed from this text. Of course, this should’ve been clear as there is a huge difference between laying money aside on a particular day and making that a day of worship. These texts are read with a ridiculously large amount of assumptions taking place.

There is a reality that every abuser of these passages must face. It is that these statements neither command worship on the first day of the week, neither do they forbid the keeping of the fourth commandment. These statements do not in anyway prove that a day other than the Sabbath should be the date of worship for the Christian, as clear statements commanding this are not found in any of the passages in question. The lack of commands automatically means that the Christian should feel no guilt for worshiping on the Sabbath and not being in Church every Sunday, and that there really is no Scriptural foundation for Sunday sacredness.

 

How To Study The Bible – Part 2 “Tools Of The Trade”

As the Christian begins studying the Bible, they might take notice of certain tools that are available to them. Examples are websites such as those listed underneath the links section of this blog. Others have been mentioned in the previous post, such as the Concordance and E-sword. All of these things have a tendency to enrich one’s study of God’s word.

While the Christian is beginning to get acquainted with these resources, temptation can come upon them. One might think, “how could there possibly be any temptation connected with a tool to help with Bible study?” The answer is that some of these tools actually come with dangers and pitfalls. There are ways in which a Concordance for instance may be misused, through for example a misreading of the Greek and Hebrew dictionaries which a Concordance comes equipped with. The tool allows for problems in both directions, but should not be tossed in the garbage solely on this grounds alone.

Before addressing the Concordance however, it is important to call the Christian’s attention to something known as Bible Commentaries. A Bible Commentary is book or set of books where a man, usually a theologian or pastor, has written about a series of texts or large sections of the Bible. The purpose of Bible Commentaries are literally what the name implies, to give an exhaustive commentary on the Scriptures, unraveling or explaining the meaning of verses. In a general sense the books are filled with the interpretations of the individuals who have written the books, which may or may not necessarily be correct.

The danger inherent in Bible Commentaries is found in the fact that they are an uninspired source of information. Using a Bible Commentary is almost the exact same thing as asking the person sitting in the pew next to you to interpret the text for you, or going to your pastor for all of the answers. One might even go so far as to equate the usage of Bible Commentaries with asking the theologians of your particular denomination about a verse. To clarify, these conversations are not necessarily inherently wrong to have in and of themselves. The problem is when you as a Christian become reliant on asking these individuals or consulting a Bible Commentary rather than studying the text for yourself.

In order to understand the potential problems that this might cause, let us for a moment take a trip back through time. Imagine for a moment that you are a young Jew, living in Palestine during the time of Christ. Jesus has just come to you to reveal himself as the Messiah. Let us imagine for a moment that he has even shown you Scriptures, proving exactly who he is, and shown you a miracle or two. Excited but still somewhat skeptical, you then go to the Pharisees and ask them about these experiences. The very first thing they tell you is that he is some kind of a false prophet, probably demon possessed [as the Jews actually did accuse him of this at one time, see John 8:52], and that everything he says is wrong. Now let us imagine that you come to the conclusion that they are probably right, since they are the leaders and theologians in the Church.

The problem with this picture is that this actually was Jesus Christ, the Messiah. You wound up missing the boat and rejecting Christ because you listened to the so-called ‘theologians’, instead of checking things out for yourself. Christians do this with their pastors more often than not, and the same has been done with Bible Commentaries. It is plausible that the Scriptures could introduce you to some concept which draws you closer to the Lord and has revealed his will to you, yet as you check a Bible Commentary on the verse you all of the sudden find that the person who wrote the commentary has given a completely different meaning to the text, or they have passed it by as dark or obscure.

Worse yet, you might find the individual’s interpretation to be completely erroneous. The fact that Bible Commentaries are uninspired documents creates a situation in which you are likely to adopt the opinions of whoever wrote the books, their theological errors, and whatever dogmas and creeds which they hold to. Therefore blindly accepting whatever materials are found in these books is not the very best policy for Bible Study.

There are several Bible passages which are applicable to this situation that warn against similar behavior. All of them may be seen below. They should be considered in the light of this situation. This is especially since many Christians have a tendency to be wholly reliant either on their Pastor or a Bible Commentary for the true interpretation of Scripture. Christians should remember that you do not have to be a Pastor or Theologian to interpret a passage of Scripture, and that the Bible is it’s own expositor. We are not a part of the Church in the Middle Ages, in which only the clergy could interpret the Bible and therefore the Bibles were kept from the people. You do not need an education from a seminary to figure out the meaning of a Bible text, neither should you rely on some one who has one.

“It is better to trust in the LORD than to put confidence in man. It is better to trust in the LORD than to put confidence in princes.” – Psalm 118:8-9

“Put not your trust in princes, nor in the son of man, in whom there is no help. His breath goeth forth, he returneth to his earth; in that very day his thoughts perish.” – Psalm 146:3-4

“Thus saith the LORD; Cursed be the man that trusteth in man, and maketh flesh his arm, and whose heart departeth from the LORD.” – Jeremiah 17:5

“The simple believeth every word: but the prudent man looketh well to his going.” – Proverbs 14:15

The first of these passages states that it is better to trust in God than in men. The next states directly that we should not put our trust in men, specifically princes are listed. There is also a curse pronounced on those who trust in men and “maketh flesh” their arm, followed by a warning to not believe every single word of a person blindly but to check it out for yourself. Yet complete reliance on a Bible Commentary would cause a Christian to be walking contrary to all of these Bible passages, and is akin to putting one hundred percent trust in your Pastor.

In view of all of these texts, consulting a Bible Commentary should not be our first move when studying a passage of Scripture. Again this would be akin to asking some one in the pews next to you to unravel the meaning for you, rather than studying it for yourself. In which case your beliefs are then based off of whatever their opinions or conclusions are and not the Bible. In view of this fact, it is important to mention that there are great Bible expositors of the past who have discarded Bible Commentaries entirely and began searching the Scriptures with nothing but their Bible and a Concordance. This is an excellent course of action for those who are just getting acquainted with their Bibles.

Somewhat related to Bible Commentaries are Bible Dictionaries. There are very good Bible Dictionaries for the Christian to use, one being the King James Dictionary. You can find this on Blue letter bible. This particular resource is invaluable for understanding the old/archaic english used all over the King James Version of the Bible. If you study from the King James, you might find this to be an awesome resource which could enhance your study of the Scriptures. The main issue however with most Bible Dictionaries is that they contain the theology of whatever Church or Theologian published them to the public, whether it is true or false. Therefore I would give them a similar treatment as Bible Commentaries, ensuring that you do not wholly rely on them when coming to a conclusion or studying a concept.

At this point in our journey, we now turn our attention back to the Concordance. This tool comes equipped with Greek and Hebrew dictionaries. This is because the Bible was originally written in these two languages, the old testament having been written in Hebrew and the New Testament in Greek. These dictionaries are an excellent tool, allowing the Bible student to study a word used in a passage in the original language in which it was written. I have personally found that it comes in handy when you run into an old english word which you do not understand, or terms are used that are not clear on the surface.

Below are two passages of Scripture. The first verse uses the term “oblation.” This is an old english word, the surface meaning of which is not clear, as not many use this term today. With a word like this in the King James Version of the Bible you have two options, either you can look it up in a King James Dictionary or you can consult the original meaning of the word using the Hebrew Dictionary attached to your concordance. In the case of this word, both might give you an equally clearer meaning of the statement used. The other passage uses words like “Raca” and “Thou Fool”, which are very strange words on the surface. In addition to the verses, I have produced the meaning of some of these words from the Concordance.

“And if thou bring an oblation of a meat offering baken in the oven, it shall be unleavened cakes of fine flour mingled with oil, or unleavened wafers anointed with oil.” – Leviticus 2:4

H7133

קֻרְבָּן קָרְבָּן

qorbân qûrbân

kor-bawn’, koor-bawn’

From H7126; something brought near the altar, that is, a sacrificial present: – oblation, that is offered, offering.

“But I say unto you, That whosoever is angry with his brother without a cause shall be in danger of the judgment: and whosoever shall say to his brother, Raca, shall be in danger of the council: but whosoever shall say, Thou fool, shall be in danger of hell fire.” – Matthew 5:22

G4469

ῥακά

rhaka

rhak-ah’

Of Chaldee origin (compare [H7386]); O empty one, that is, thou worthless (as a term of utter vilification): – Raca.

G3474

μωρός

mōros

mo-ros’

Probably form the base of G3466; dull or stupid (as if shut up), that is, heedless, (morally) blockhead, (apparently) absurd: – fool (-ish, X -ishness).

I have learned by experience that the result is formatted first with the definition of the word, and then the various ways in which it is translated across the Bible. In this case the word “oblation” means “something brought near the alter, that is, a sacrificial present.” The word “offering” comes to mind as one reads the texts. This is one way the word is actually translated, and is a thought that seems to fit given the definition. The word “offering”, although not the same Hebrew word, is even used in the verse. You could even theoretically use Leviticus 2:4 as it stands to define the word “Oblation” as an offering, given the wording of the passage.

Some old english words such as “wherefore”, “ought”, or “unto” do not necessarily have helpful Hebrew or Greek definitions attached to them, and if you struggle with these words I personally recommend either using a King James Dictionary such as the one previously mentioned, or looking them up on the internet [I have done this in some cases and found the definition for old english words like “Unto”].

I will now draw your attention to the words “Raca” and “Thou Fool” found in Matthew 5:22. Note that one is defined as a term of utter vilification, and the other is defined as “dull or stupid, as if shut up, that is, heedless (morally) blockhead, (apparently) absurd.” Both of the definitions given make these terms sound like insults or general hurtful remarks thrust at a person. This gave me the impression that this passage is addressing the statements you might throw at some one in moments of anger, especially since the passages that follow speak of making reconciliation with your brethren in the Church. In this case, this is an example of how a Greek dictionary attached to a Strong’s Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible can enhance some of your studies of God’s word.

These tools can help you unravel confusing words, such as “Raca” and “Thou Fool”. It can even enhance your understanding of what the passage is saying to a certain extent. However one needs to use these tools with caution. There is a right way and wrong way to use these dictionaries. The video below produces an outstanding example of one way in which a Christian can fall into error using this tool if they are not careful. Even following closely beside this problem is the way the definition is set up. As previously noted, you are given the definition of a word and then the way it is translated. Sometimes multiple definitions for one word are given. The Bible Student should always check the context of a passage when they are confronted with this situation to avoid inserting the wrong meaning of a word. Remember that as lay people, most of us are not Greek and Hebrew scholars, neither do we need to be to understand God’s Word.

Another point to take into consideration is that you should avoid consulting the Greek and Hebrew dictionaries first to find the answers as to what the overall meaning of a text is. You should always seek to compare Scripture with Scripture before consulting this tool. In spite of these potential draw backs, I do not advocate discarding this resource, but instead using it very carefully and prayerfully.

Next I want to draw your attention to resources such as E-Sword. Much of the features of E-Sword were dwelt upon in the previous post. We already know that it is complete with a powerful Bible search engine that allows you to control the complete range of the search, whether it is just focused on one book or several books of the Bible. E-sword also comes with features such as a verse analyzer, which examines words in any given verse. It can be set to have a range from one passage in the beginning of a book all the way to the end of a book, and it essentially tells you how many times certain words are used across a book of the Bible or in just a few verses.

According to the program’s built-in user guide, this can help you determine the importance of a word. The tool itself seems handy, and is worth calling your attention to, even though I have not personally used it much in my experience of studying with E-sword. E-sword is also equipped with a split-screen function, allowing you to study at least two verses at once from different books of the Bible. This is very handy for when you have a Bible which has a lot of chain references and you want to look something up without leaving your present position in the Bible.

There is also a Gospel harmony tool, which takes all of the Gospels and shows all of the accounts of the same event. This is something I see coming in handy if one wants to study the varying descriptions of last day events normally found in Matthew 24 across different Gospels. An even cooler feature is it’s built in concordance. Obviously the function of a physical Concordance in finding verses is virtually replaced by the Bible search engine. However E-sword comes with the Greek & Hebrew words built right in. All one has to do is click a button to see Strong’s numbers, which then allow you get the definitions if you hover your mouse over them or click them. You can also download a KJC or “King James Concordance”, which just like a regular Concordance gives you a list of every verse that uses a particular word across the Bible in the same fashion as does a physical Concordance.

The draw back with E-Sword is some of the resources available for download. It seems a lot of Bible programs are made with a philosophy of study which involves an emphasis on consulting Bible Commentaries, something already dwelt upon at length in this article. There are Bible Commentaries and Dictionaries available for download with E-Sword that I would use with caution for the same reasons already dwelt upon, in addition to resources I would not put entire reliance upon if not avoid entirely, such as the Apocrypha [which is uninspired] or the writings of the early Church Fathers. At some future time, a post will be given surrounding some of these writers from the early centuries of Christianity. For the time being it will suffice to say “use and read with extreme caution”, as some of them advocate the worship of the stars, have been known to mix Christianity with Greek Philosophy, and had some weird pagan ideas creeping into their doctrinal thinking.

Some might think this impossible considering these were the early Christians, but remember warnings from Paul concerning this matter, and the fact that even today heresies creep into the Church. In the book of Acts we find the following statements. “For I know this, that after my departing shall grievous wolves enter in among you, not sparing the flock. Also of your own selves shall men arise, speaking perverse things, to draw away disciples after them. Therefore watch, and remember, that by the space of three years I ceased not to warn every one night and day with tears.” – Acts 20:29-31. In view of this fact, it is important to read with caution.

In conclusion, it is my hope that all of these tools will be helpful in your study of God’s word. I hope also that you find the following videos helpful as you begin to study the Bible.

How To Study The Bible – Part 1

“What on earth do I do with this?” The new believer in Christ often may ask, as a Bible is slapped in their hands. First introductions to the Scriptures can be an intimidating experience. Some who have been freshly converted to the faith may not enjoy the task of reading, and therefore find Bible Study to be difficult if not boring. Others may experience problems in finding the time to sit down and read their Bibles. Perhaps their jobs or families have become so demanding on their time, that it is difficult to make time to study the Bible.

While these problems may confront the new believer, more often than not the task of trying to figure out how to study the Bible is daunting, difficult, and even discouraging. The new believer may wander the Church, asking numerous believers how to study the Bible. It is unfortunate that the individual in this position is most often met with statements such as, “there is no real method to study” or “just read it.” These answers of course do not answer the question, “How do I study the Bible?” Even more discouragement might be met in asking the pastor, as they might simply just respond by handing you Bible Studies that you might go through, without actually teaching you to study.

There is an old saying which holds true to this scenario. If you give a man a fish, you feed him for a day. If you teach a man to fish, you feed him for life. Giving packets of studies without teaching the person to study for themselves obviously doesn’t answer the question either. Yet the new believer in Christ might be even more discouraged when they are confronted with the various books of the Bible. Their mind might be filled with questions like, “which one do I start in?” Or they may feel intimidated by all sixty-six books of Scripture, from the various historical books right on down to the book of Revelation.

Still more difficult is the cryptic symbolism found throughout many places in Scripture. One might find themselves asking, “what on earth does this mean?” It can leave one feeling confused, discouraged, and not really wanting to bother reading it because of their lack of understanding. With all these facts in mind, how exactly is the new believer to study their Bible? This seems a good question that not a lot of Christians know how to answer. Perhaps this is one possible reason that the Bible is neglected by so many Christians, even ones of long standing.

In spite of all the challenges and discouragement the new believer may face in this area, they are not to be discouraged. There are Christians, including the present writer of this article, who have learned much about this topic. I speak from experience when I say that it is possible to gain an understanding of Scripture through diligent study and the reception of wisdom from above. It is my hope that some of the things which I have learned by experience and been taught by others will be of aid to you in your own search of the Scriptures.

With that said, one has to consider what the true objective of the question is. Many Christians overlook the fact that the one who asks how to study the Bible is really seeking for methods of interpretation. They are after the means by which they can unravel the meaning of a passage. The new believer wants to know how to dig into the word of God. Telling them to “just read it” doesn’t answer their question or really give them what they are looking for.

I speak from experience when I say that the Bible is a deep book. It may be read from one cover to the next and yet the person completely misses the point. Unless one stops to think about what the word of God is saying, they may not be able to apply the passage to their life. Speed reading is obviously not the very best policy when attempting to study one’s Bible. One may skip over powerful and convicting statements in their efforts to speed read through the Bible in a whole year. In contrast the person who studies one passage until they understand it’s relation to their life and salvation has gained more than the speed reader, and the resulting outward changes will likely be seen.

Than it is therefore important to go very slowly, taking one verse at a time and digesting each thought presented until you have achieved complete understanding. Yet this is not the first step to take in seeking to study the Bible. One of the first things to consider when approaching the Bible is your attitude. Are you approaching the Bible to vindicate your own opinions or prove some doctrinal point? Are you studying the scriptures to find evidence of your preconceived opinions or traditions? If you approach the Bible with this type of thinking, you will wrest the Scriptures every single time.

You will be likely to force meaning upon passages which they do not have or remove them from their context. One can produce all of the disconnected utterances in the world to prove whatever point they want, yet this does not prove them correct, or make their methods of interpretation right. It is important to approach the Bible with a teachable attitude. I would advise you to come to the Bible without a single bias. Be prepared to lay aside all opinions, doctrines, traditional teachings, or the sayings of theologians. Leave these things at the door of investigation and see what the word of God teaches for yourself, and if any of these things do not line up with the Scriptures abandon them.

The next step in this process is to pray. If you neglect prayer, it doesn’t matter what methods of interpretation you use. You will still be liable to wrest and misinterpret statements in Scripture. The only way to avoid this is not only to approach with the correct attitude, but to pray before you start. Ask for the aid of divine guidance, for God to open the Scriptures to you. There are several promises in the Bible which you can apply to your own experience in studying the word, and which you may present in prayer before beginning your study. They may be found below.

“Howbeit when he, the Spirit of truth, is come, he will guide you into all truth: for he shall not speak of himself; but whatsoever he shall hear, that shall he speak: and he will shew you things to come.” – John 16:13

“But when the Comforter is come, whom I will send unto you from the Father, even the Spirit of truth, which proceedeth from the Father, he shall testify of me:” – John 15:26

“But the Comforter, which is the Holy Ghost, whom the Father will send in my name, he shall teach you all things, and bring all things to your remembrance, whatsoever I have said unto you.” – John 14:26

The first verse uses the cryptic phrase “Spirit of Truth”. In order to see exactly what that is, one need only look at the connection between all three passages. The middle verse defines the spirit of truth as the “Comforter”, which is defined as the “Holy Ghost” by John 14:26. The Holy Ghost is also known in Christian circles and in the Bible as the Holy Spirit, thereby making the term “Spirit of Truth” another name for the Holy Ghost. The passage from the fifteenth chapter of John helps to establish this fact, while the other two passages are the promises which are most applicable to your study of the Bible.

The first statement suggests that when the “Spirit of Truth” is come, he will “guide you into all truth.” This means that one function of the Holy Ghost is to reveal the truth to you, and the other passage obviously states that he will teach you all things. This means that the Holy Ghost is somebody you want helping you with Bible Study. If you put the two passages together, he will guide you into the true meaning of Scripture and teach you what verses actually mean! This kind of aid may be received through prayer, as can be shown especially by a reading of Luke 11:9-13. This means that if you start your Bible Study out with earnest prayer for the aid of the Holy Spirit, you will more than likely be met with better results from your study. You will be much more likely to come forth from your study with the true meaning of the text.

Let us imagine that after this step, the new believer turns to the book of John. They begin in the very first passage. Immediately it seems their heart sinks. Why one might ask? The reason being, they are immediately confronted with nothing other than the very first passage of John, which has a very cryptic appearance. The verse reads, “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.” – John 1:1. “Word” is used a great many times in this first passage to the point where one is left scratching their head in confusion, wondering if any part of the Bible will ever make sense.

However there is absolutely no need to become discouraged. The Bible is full of statements that are very cryptic in their appearance. This does not in any way mean that they cannot be understood. After all, with those two promises from this very same book in regards to the Holy Ghost, how is it that something cannot be understood? If the Spirit teaches you all things, the idea that you cannot understand the Bible is absurd. Therefore the beginner Bible Student is not to become discouraged.

Yet this passage furnishes us with sufficient evidence to back up that which was earlier stated. Cryptic statements found in the Bible, such as this one, are practically screaming that you should stop and examine them. Speed reading from here forward would cause one to completely miss the thought found in this passage. Therefore it is important to stop and examine the text.

Then from this point forward, your next move is observation. It is key to pay attention to all of the details taking place in any given text. This can help in the process of unraveling the meaning of any given verse. With John 1:1 we learn details such as the fact that the word was in the beginning, that the word is with God, and the Word itself is in fact God. John 14:26 is shown below as an example of how far attention to detail can go.

“But the Comforter, which is the Holy Ghost, whom the Father will send in my name, he shall teach you all things, and bring all things to your remembrance, whatsoever I have said unto you.” – John 14:26

From this verse, we learn that that the Holy Ghost is the comforter. We can also see that the Holy Ghost is defined as a “he”, making the Holy Ghost a person. Sometimes words can have huge theological implications, so it is important to pay attention and watch everything that is going on in a verse. Looking at all of the details eliminates focusing in on only half of a text, so be sure and read the entire passage rather than focusing on small snippets. The rest of the verse tells us that the Holy Ghost will bring all things to our remembrance and teach us all things. The end of the passage says, “whatsoever I have said unto you.” Whoever this mysterious person is, it is office of the Holy Ghost to bring what they have said to our remembrance. We’re left with a very important point and question as we look at the details of this text. Just who exactly is doing the talking?

If one were to scroll up in their Bibles to the twenty-third verse of the fourteenth chapter of John, they would learn just who in the twenty-sixth passage is talking. “Whatsoever I have said unto you” is a phrase which is spoken by Jesus. To make this fact much more clear, three passages which occur before John 14:26 have been produced below. They teach us very clearly that there is no change in individuals talking from verse twenty-three on down to twenty-six, therefore making the statement “whatsoever I have said unto you” a reference to the sayings of Jesus. Therefore it is the office of the Holy Ghost to bring whatever Jesus has said to our remembrance.

“Jesus answered and said unto him, If a man love me, he will keep my words: and my Father will love him, and we will come unto him, and make our abode with him. He that loveth me not keepeth not my sayings: and the word which ye hear is not mine, but the Father’s which sent me. These things have I spoken unto you, being yet present with you. ” – John 14:23-25

This fact raises an important point. Details can be found in the context. Everything surrounding a passage has a bearing on the meaning of a verse. Watch for a change in persons talking, a swap of subject, words that link passages together, or details that unravel the verse. As shown by the above texts, something as simple as who is doing the talking can have an important bearing on the meaning of a passage. This can also mean the difference between wresting a text outside of it’s true meaning and coming to a proper understanding of it. Passages isolated from their context is the means by which individuals fall into error. Strange theological ideas can be conjured by isolating passages and phrases and putting one’s own spin on them, making it very important to read a passage in it’s original connection.

A verse-by-verse study of the Scriptures is not eliminated by employing such methods. This in fact only creates a situation in which one needs to examine everything happening surrounding a verse. As for the case of John 1:1, with the text as the very first passage of the book obviously nothing is occurring before the verse. One is more than capable however of looking ahead to determine if anything in the next few verses provides clues as to what the text is talking about.

Supposing nothing is found in the texts that are ahead which unravel it, what is the next move? From here, asking yourself questions about a Bible verse can be a helpful method of unraveling a text. The goal is to attempt to answer them from the Bible. Your questions should target the details of the passage, especially those which remain in obscurity. Therefore one of the most obvious questions you can ask at this point is, “What is the word?” You could also ask yourself, “What is the beginning?” Still another good one is, “What does it mean for the word to be with God?”

The task of attempting to answer these questions from Scripture can be daunting, even seemingly impossible for the new believer. Those who are not completely acquainted with their Bibles would not know how to search for texts which provide the answers for other texts. How is the new believer to answer any questions they may have from the Bible? There is a tool called a concordance, and this in fact is the answer.

A Concordance is like an exhaustive compendium of words used in the Bible. It is a super thick text book composed of every single word used in Scripture. It is arranged alphabetically, making things fairly easy to find. A Bible Student could take “word” from John 1:1, look it up in the Concordance, and find themselves confronted with a complete list of every verse across the Scriptures which uses the word “word.” This would allow you to trace the phrase all across the Bible. You should be able pick these up at most Christian book stores.

However the physical concordance may seem scary. One could spend hours thumbing through the super thick text book before they eventually land on what they’re looking for. Electronic versions are available totally free of charge. They can be used from any one of the links found on this site. In addition, E-sword [which is a Bible program] contains a powerful search engine which has the same functions as a concordance. It is even far superior to a physical concordance, as it will allow you to trace out complete sentences, phrases, or multiple words across the Bible. You can even narrow your search range to only target specific books of the Bible.

I personally recommend E-sword, as it’s search capabilities will greatly speed up the process of searching the Bible. The next step for the beginner Bible student from here is to take a concordance or Bible search engine, and search out answers for the questions that he or she asked. If they asked what the Word is, than their next move would be to type “word” into the search engine. The student is then to trace out the phrase or word until it’s meaning is literally explained. If the explanation does no violence to the main text as it stands, and makes perfect sense, you have found the correct meaning. If not than you need to look again.

If the search range on E-sword is set from Genesis to Revelation, the Bible student is confronted with six hundred seventy-five verses. At first this fact can seem a little scary. However it may be helpful to the beginner Bible Student to set the range to focus first on the book you are already studying, allowing you to get a rapid survey through every passage in the book of John which uses the phrase “word.” If you don’t find anything in the book you are presently studying which answers your questions, you can then widen your search to include the rest of the Bible. Narrowing your search results in this fashion can help you more rapidly land on the correct passage that explains the verse you are studying.

Focusing the search range on just the book of John would cause the Bible student to come across an interesting passage fourteen verses down from John 1:1. The verse reads, “And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, (and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father,) full of grace and truth.” – John 1:14. It should be obvious that, given this is in the same chapter of the book of John, this is most likely talking about the same “Word.” Although the meaning is not clear on the surface, the fact that it is in the same connection as the first verse should make it abundantly clear that an examination of this passage will unravel at least a portion of the other verse.

Applying some of the earlier steps, one might notice that this verse is stating that the word “was made flesh” and “dwelt among among us.” John 1:1 already defined the word as God. If you put the pieces together as you pay close attention, this means that John 1:14 is saying that God dwelt among us. Another detail is that when the verse says “and we beheld his glory” it is obviously still talking about the “Word”, given the same connection. Still a more striking detail is found when the statement says “the glory as of the only begotten of the Father.” All of these details furnish you with subject matter for the search engine.

Tracing out the word “begotten” produces only twenty-four texts, so you do not have many verses to wade through at this point. Out of the first twelve texts, only three use the phrase “begotten” in the same way that John 1:14 does. One of those three texts is the very verse in question, therefore eliminating it. The two verses remaining are John 1:18 and John 3:16. Both of them are reproduced below.

“For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.” – John 3:16

“No man hath seen God at any time; the only begotten Son, which is in the bosom of the Father, he hath declared him.” – John 1:18

Both of these passages attach the phrase “begotten” to the word “Son”, and imply that the only begotten of the Father is most likely the Son of God. Therefore if one determines who the Son of God is, one has found the meaning of the term “Word.” Searching the phrase “Son of God” produces one hundred and eighty-two verses. Paying close attention to them, you might notice that your Bible search engine [in this case we are using E-sword as an example] is giving you all of the passages that use all of the words you typed in. Therefore a lot of the content in the results has no bearing on what you are looking for. My recommendation at this point is to skim over things rapidly until you come across something that actually literally explains the phrase “Son of God.”

The Bible Student eventually lands on a passage in Matthew. The verse reads, “And, behold, they cried out, saying, What have we to do with thee, Jesus, thou Son of God? art thou come hither to torment us before the time?” – Matthew 8:29. This verse is defining Jesus as the Son of God. We may therefore conclude that the only begotten son of God is Jesus Christ, making the only begotten of the Father Jesus, and making Jesus “the Word” mentioned in John 1:1.

This brings an important principle to mind. Whenever you come across a cryptic statement in the Bible, remember that it can always be explained by some other portion of the Bible. Comparing one Scripture with another is a practice which can always help to unlock Bible verses that you are confused about. The use of a concordance or Bible search engine makes this much easier than it sounds, and eliminates the need for having a complete knowledge of everything the Bible says in order to compare one verse with another.

In addition, these tools allow you to follow yet another important principle. A sound approach for Bible Study is to line up everything the Bible says about any given topic before coming to a conclusion about a doctrinal point. Neglecting to do this causes an individual to miss the complete doctrinal picture. You cannot gain a full understanding of the Bible’s overall teaching about a subject from one or two verses, or even half of a verse, when the rest of the Bible disproves whatever fallacious conclusions one might draw from snippets.

As you begin to apply these methods, you may want to take notes. E-sword comes with built in note-taking software. The built-in abilities of E-sword are just like any other word processor, with changeable fonts, bullet points, and the ability to make numbered lists. An especially cool feature of the program is the ability to format any Scripture reference you type into the note taking editor as a link back to that verse and a “tool tip”, to where when you hover your mouse over the reference a speech bubble containing the entire verse will appear. All of these abilities massively come in handy when studying the Bible.

Some of you may prefer something which you can hold in your hand. This means one hundred page spiral ring or composition notebooks will be your best friend. Taking notes will allow you to focus in on the details more easily, underlining or circling key phrases and words and noting all of the observations you make. I would even suggest writing down your questions, and any passages which answer them, as well as whatever your final conclusion as to what the passage means is.

At this point it is prudent to give a word of caution. Your objective in studying the passage is not to find or write down what the text means to you, but to unravel the actual meaning of the text and apply it to your life. Another word to define what coming up with what the text means to you is Eisegesis. This is a negative thing which often causes people to go off into error, and is therefore something you want to avoid. Eisegesis is defined as reading something into a text which is not there, or forcing a meaning on a verse which it doesn’t have. A good example would be taking Daniel 7:4 and applying the Lion in the verse to Belgium without proving it from the Bible.

Others have taken Bible passages and reapplied them, giving them a new meaning which they did not originally have or convey. The reapplication of prophecies which have been fulfilled in the past might be another good example of Eisegesis. This is also a pitfall with Bible Study that you want to avoid. As you study through prophecy, a good point to note is that sometimes the Bible gives you the proper interpretation immediately after giving you a specific dream or vision. If that is the case, than interpreting the text as anything other than what it gave you is doing violence to the Scriptures.

You will also want to make sure that you apply figurative terms correctly. As you run into cryptic phrases and statements in the Scriptures, it can be tempting to apply figures anywhere in the Bible. Let us hypothetically suppose that you have just discovered that trees represent people in prophecy. You then turn your Bible to Genesis and you read about the tree of life in Genesis 3. We have produced the passages in mind below. Read them carefully and then think about applying the hypothetical symbolism mentioned to the verses.

“And the LORD God said, Behold, the man is become as one of us, to know good and evil: and now, lest he put forth his hand, and take also of the tree of life, and eat, and live for ever: Therefore the LORD God sent him forth from the garden of Eden, to till the ground from whence he was taken. So he drove out the man; and he placed at the east of the garden of Eden Cherubims, and a flaming sword which turned every way, to keep the way of the tree of life.” – Genesis 3:22-24

If you think about it, reading these passages with the hypothetical symbolism really doesn’t make any sense whatsoever. You would be reading this passage as literally saying, “and now, lest he put forth his hand, and take also of the people of life, and eat, and live for ever.” When you stumble across a figurative term in the Bible, remember that it doesn’t apply to every single verse across the Scriptures. In order to further deduce whether or not one should be applying figurative terms to whatever is taking place in the text, it is important to identify the type of literature in the Scriptures.

A good example would be prophecy vs literal history. In the case of Genesis, the entire book is literal history. You would run into much the same in the book of Exodus. Unless you are dealing with what is known as typology, which is a subject for a later time, generally you are not going to find something prophetic in stories that are to be read literally. Neither will you find anything allegorical among them. It is usually only those who wish to get around doctrines taught in the Bible or those who lack in faith who interpret historical books as allegorical.

Parables can be interpreted in this way, and there are a number of ways in which they may be identified. The first is that generally they are spoken by Jesus, usually beginning with the phrase “there was a certain man” or “a certain man”. Another way that you can spot them is through a statement which directly says that they are parables, an example of which is “Hear another parable” or “And then he spoke in parables.” You can also spot them by the fact that they are spoken in dialog by some one, as well as through their obvious fictional content, one example being talking trees found in Judges 9.

In like manner prophecy generally has similar identifying features. It usually takes the form of dreams or visions, which are always identified as such with a “I’m going into vision now” or “then so and so had a dream” type statement. Their content usually is the most cryptic, and sometimes appear to violate the simple laws of nature on the surface. An example of this is found in Revelation 12, in which the Bible describes a woman standing on the moon and clothed with the sun.

“And there appeared a great wonder in heaven; a woman clothed with the sun, and the moon under her feet, and upon her head a crown of twelve stars: And she being with child cried, travailing in birth, and pained to be delivered. And there appeared another wonder in heaven; and behold a great red dragon, having seven heads and ten horns, and seven crowns upon his heads.” – Revelation 12:1-3

“And the great dragon was cast out, that old serpent, called the Devil, and Satan, which deceiveth the whole world: he was cast out into the earth, and his angels were cast out with him.” – Revelation 12:9

Obviously I have never seen a dragon with seven heads and ten horns, therefore this is meant to be taken in a symbolic sense. Note that later the Bible gives you the interpretation of the symbol used, telling you that the dragon is Satan. Since literal verses do not use this kind of language, or a secondary interpretation is not given, it should be relatively easy to discriminate between the symbolic and the literal in Scripture. With this discrimination, you should be able to pick out when to apply the meaning of figures and when not to. Especially in the case of Genesis should you consider avoiding doing that, as this is where some strange theological ideas are generated from.

At this point, let us say that the the beginner Bible Student still is unable to figure out the meaning of a Bible verse. Scary as that thought may sound, I have in fact encountered this phenomenon. In spite of all my efforts to search around, I have at times struggled with attempting to unravel the meaning of a passage. This happens to the best of us, and is something which will actually enrich your experience in studying the word. The reason being is that it will drive you to your knees in prayer, where you will earnestly plead with God for the true meaning of the passage until he answers you. I can speculate that the Scriptures were designed to do this very thing in order to generate a relationship between you and God, where you are placed in a position of having to diligently inquire in prayer about a text or difficulty.

This experience is likely to have a humbling effect on you. If you come to the Bible with your intellectual pride, depending wholly on yourself or your own abilities to figure out what passages mean, you are likely to have your pride laid in the dust. The rich experience of studying the word is likely to create in you a dependence on God alone for interpreting the Bible. Therefore you should not be discouraged because you come across a text or two that you don’t understand in spite of all your best efforts. It is times like those for which the Bible itself actually offers you a solution, which may be found in all of the promises below.

“If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him.” – James 1:5

“Therefore I say unto you, What things soever ye desire, when ye pray, believe that ye receive them, and ye shall have them.” – Mark 11:24

“But the Comforter, which is the Holy Ghost, whom the Father will send in my name, he shall teach you all things, and bring all things to your remembrance, whatsoever I have said unto you.” – John 14:26

The first verse is self-explanatory. It simply states that if you ask, God will liberally impart to you wisdom. With that in mind, you basically have no reason to be discouraged by the cryptic symbolism of the Bible, especially that which you find in the book of Revelation. The second verse is virtually stating that whatever you want, if you ask in prayer while believing, God will give it to you. While there are some conditions to this verse as will be discussed at a later time, this passage most definitely applies to the situation in question. The third verse has already been examined, but you can conclude from it that since the office of the Holy Spirit is to “teach you all things”, he will aid you with passages you are struggling over if you just ask and believe.

It is my hope that the new believer in Christ would find these methods helpful as they begin to search the word.